Mahanavami in India in 2023

Mahanavami in India in 2023

  How long until Mahanavami?
Mahanavami
  Dates of Mahanavami in India
2023 Oct 23
BiharMon, Oct 23Regional Holiday
KeralaMon, Oct 23Regional Holiday
MeghalayaMon, Oct 23Regional Holiday
Uttar PradeshMon, Oct 23Regional Holiday
2021 Oct 14
KeralaThu, Oct 14Regional Holiday
MeghalayaThu, Oct 14Regional Holiday
NagalandThu, Oct 14Regional Holiday
Uttar PradeshThu, Oct 14Regional Holiday
2019 Oct 7
BiharMon, Oct 7Regional Holiday
KeralaMon, Oct 7Regional Holiday
MeghalayaMon, Oct 7Regional Holiday
Uttar PradeshMon, Oct 7Regional Holiday
2018 Oct 18
BiharThu, Oct 18Regional Holiday
JharkhandThu, Oct 18Regional Holiday
KarnatakaThu, Oct 18Regional Holiday
KeralaThu, Oct 18Regional Holiday
MeghalayaThu, Oct 18Regional Holiday
OdishaThu, Oct 18Regional Holiday
Uttar PradeshThu, Oct 18Regional Holiday
2017 Sep 29
KarnatakaFri, Sep 29Regional Holiday
KeralaFri, Sep 29Regional Holiday
OdishaFri, Sep 29Regional Holiday
TripuraFri, Sep 29Regional Holiday
Uttar PradeshFri, Sep 29Regional Holiday
  Summary

The festival of Dusseha symbolizes the triumph of good over evil in the legend of Rama and Ravana

  Which regions observe Mahanavami in 2023?
  BiharOct 23Regional Holiday
  KeralaOct 23Regional Holiday
  MeghalayaOct 23Regional Holiday
  Uttar PradeshOct 23Regional Holiday
Related holidays

On this day, many of your colleagues in India will celebrate the culmination of the ten day Dussehra festival.

It may be known in some regions as Vijayadashami and in parts of southern India, it is known as Dasara. Other regional spellings include Dashera and Dussera.

As this is a ten day festival based on a lunar date with many important days and also because it has many different names in the various regions on India, it is difficult to determine when each region has a holiday. On this site, we show the date of the tenth day and you can assume that most regions will observe this a public holiday.

In India, the festival of Dussehra symbolizes the triumph of good over evil.

The festival traditionally represents the legend of Rama and Ravana.

Ravana, the demon king, abducted the beloved Princess of India, Sita.

The Lord Rama rescued the Princess, proving victorious over the powerful and evil King Ravana.

The Dussehra festival is ten days long, culminating on the tenth day, the Dussehra holiday.

On the day of Dussehra, large statues of Ravana are constructed and brought into open fields.

These effigies are burned and with them the evil they represent, so that the people are allowed to follow the path of virtue and goodness throughout the year.

Ayudha Puja

On the ninth day of Dussehra, Ayudha Puja is celebrated in several regions of India. Celebrations may involve many common and seemingly mundane tools and implements used in everyday life, such as computers, books, cars, or kitchen tools.

The aim is to see the divine in everything, notably those things used in one's livelihood. It is believed that this day is also a blessed one for any

Navaratri

In the southern India states, this festival is called Navaratri ('nine nights') and revolves around the worship of the goddesses Lakshmi and Sarasvati. Lakshmi is associated with good luck and wealth, and Sarasvati is linked with wisdom and fertility.

The festival is a time for visiting friends and relatives, and houses are decorated with colourful displays of toys and images of gods. In Gujarat there are nine days of music and dancing.

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