St Cyril and Methodius Day in Czech Republic in 2020

St Cyril and Methodius Day in Czech Republic in 2020
  How long until St Cyril and Methodius Day?
This holiday next takes place in 350 days.
  Dates of St Cyril and Methodius Day in Czech Republic
2021Czech Republic Mon, Jul 5National Holiday
2020Czech Republic Sun, Jul 5National Holiday
2019Czech Republic Fri, Jul 5National Holiday
2018Czech Republic Thu, Jul 5National Holiday
2017Czech Republic Wed, Jul 5National Holiday
  Summary
Slavic missionaries Cyril (Constantine) and Metod (Methodius) came to Great Moravia
  St Cyril and Methodius Day in other countries
St Cyril and Methodius Day internationally

When is Saints Cyril and Methodius Day?

This public holiday is always celebrated on 5 July in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, who follow the Roman Catholic feast days.

In Bulgaria, this day is known as 'Bulgarian Education and Culture, and Slavonic Literature Day', 'Culture and Literacy Day' or 'Alphabet Day' and is celebrated following the Orthodox calendar on 24 May. It is also a public holiday in Macedonia on 24 May.

Who were Saints Cyril and Methodius?

Saints Cyril and Methodius were two Byzantine brothers born in Thessalonica in the 9th century. Part of a prominent Christian family, their father was Greek and their mother was Bulgarian.

In 860 Cyril and Methodius went as missionaries to what is today the Ukraine, spreading Christianity among the Slavic peoples of Bulgaria, Great Moravia and Pannonia.

They are credited with devising the Glagolitic alphabet. At the request of the Moravian prince Rastislav, they began to transcribe religious books from Greek into Old Bulgarian.

Their alphabet is seen as the precursor to Cyrillic, which was named after Cyril. Today most of the Slavic countries, including Russia, still use an extension of that alphabet.

Did you know?

Over 300 million people in 12 countries use the Cyrillic script.

Throughout his life, Cyril was known as Constantine, only adopting his religious name of Cyril while on his death bed.

Both brothers are venerated in the Orthodox Church as saints with the title of "equal-to-apostles".

In 1880, Pope Leo XIII introduced their feast into the calendar of the Roman Catholic Church. In 1980, Pope John Paul II declared them co-patron saints of Europe, together with Benedict of Nursia.

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