National Aboriginal Day in Canada in 2020

National Aboriginal Day in Canada in 2020
  How long until National Aboriginal Day?
This holiday next takes place in 192 days.
  Dates of National Aboriginal Day in Canada
2021 Jun 21
Northwest TerritoriesMon, Jun 21Regional Holiday
YukonMon, Jun 21Regional Holiday
2020 Jun 21
Northwest TerritoriesSun, Jun 21Regional Holiday
YukonSun, Jun 21Regional Holiday
2019 Jun 21
Northwest TerritoriesFri, Jun 21Regional Holiday
YukonFri, Jun 21Regional Holiday
2018 Jun 21
Northwest TerritoriesThu, Jun 21Regional Holiday
YukonThu, Jun 21Regional Holiday
2017 Jun 21
Northwest TerritoriesWed, Jun 21Regional Holiday
YukonWed, Jun 21Regional Holiday
  Summary
A Provincial Statutory Holiday since 2001 in Northwest Territories and since 2017 in Yukon
  Which regions observe National Aboriginal Day in 2020?
Northwest Territories  Northwest TerritoriesJun 21Regional Holiday
Yukon  YukonJun 21Regional Holiday

When is National Aboriginal Day?

National Aboriginal Day is a provincial statutory holiday in North West Territories and Yukon. It has been a Provincial Statutory Holiday since 2001 in Northwest Territories and since 2017 in Yukon

It is observed on 21st June and marks the summer solstice. This date was chosen to reflect the spiritual importance of the summer solstice to all of the indigenous peoples of Canada.

Interestingly, another Provincial holiday has its roots in the same event, as the National Day of Quebec is celebrated on 24th June, the Feast of St. John, which in turn was a popular holiday due to its proximity to the summer solstice, a key festival in Pagan Europe.

On 21 June 2017, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the intention to change the name of National Aboriginal Day to National Indigenous Peoples Day. The change to “Indigenous” brings the Canadian government in line with the United Nations use of the word in international discussions as well as the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

What is National Aboriginal Day?

The idea for a nationwide day to celebrate Indigenous culture and contributions was first proposed in 1982, by the Assembly of First Nations, formerly the National Indian Brotherhood.

The first National Aboriginal Day was proclaimed by Roméo LeBlanc, Canada’s governor general in 1996 following consultation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis leaders. The Canadian Constitution recognises these three groups as the Indigenous Peoples. The aim of the day is to celebrate the cultures and contributions indigenous peoples have made to Canada. It is also an opportunity for all Canadians to learn about our country’s history and to celebrate Canada's diversity.

National Aboriginal Day forms part of the Celebrate Canada program, which also includes the National Day of Quebec on 24 June, Canadian Multiculturalism Day on 27 June and Canada Day on 1 July.

National Aboriginal Day has been a provincial statutory holiday in North West Territories since 2001 and since 2017 in Yukon. Indigenous peoples make up 52 percent and 23 percent of the populations of North West Territories and Yukon respectively.

The importance of the summer solstice to those who lived in northern latitudes is clear. It marks the maximum amount of daylight each year and the furthest point from the long, dark, cold nights of winter. For instance, did you know that rather than celebrating independence or any other great political event like most countries, the National Day of Greenland ('Ullortuneq') is celebrated on the summer solstice?

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